Chase Dejong: Oceans 16

-The K Zone-

January 11th  2017

Chase Dejong

Interview by Mike Duffy


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Recently I was able to interview Dodgers #16 top prospect (according to MLB Pipeline) As of 2017 he is the #15 prospect in the Mariners Organization. Chase Dejong. In 2015 he helped the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes win the California League title and this past November his contract was selected by the Dodgers from their AAA affiliate the OKC Dodgers. While getting to talk to him, I found that he has a great taste in films and a great respect for the old stadiums. Recently made his Major League Debut with the Seattle Mariners!


Mike Duffy: I was wondering when you go from high school, minor leagues, to the majors, what was the biggest challenge when you reach each stage?

Chase Dejong: I think the biggest challenge at any level is being able to adapt to what the hitter is doing. It’s a constant battle of trying to disrupt the hitters timing no matter what level you’re at be it high school or MLB.


Mike Duffy: What did you do best this season?

Chase Dejong: This season I was able to pound the strike zone with quality strikes and cover my innings as a starting pitcher going 5+ more times then not.


Mike Duffy: This offseason whats the major thing your planning to work on?

Chase Dejong: This offseason I’ve been trying to put on some weight to help me last longer and cover more innings. Aiming for 180+ innings.


Mike Duffy: Whats was your favorite thing about being an Dodger?

Chase Dejong: The legacy that comes with the uniform is something I’m very proud to be able to have the chance to be a small part of.


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Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite hobby besides baseball?

Chase Dejong: I love golf that’s my favorite hobby. I’m also a bit of a movie buff.


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Mike Duffy: Who was your favorite baseball player growing up?

Chase Dejong: Nolan Ryan is my favorite ball player of all time.


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Mike Duffy: Who’s the hardest batter you faced this season?

Chase Dejong: The 3rd baseman from NWA last name Ramos was the most difficult batter I continually faced all summer.


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Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite stadium?

Chase Dejong: There was something magical about old yankee stadium that will always stick with me.


Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite movie/tv show?

Chase Dejong: Favorite movie is ocean’s 11 (the whole series really).


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Mike Duffy: Do you have a motto or a thing to do to get you out of a rough time?

Chase Dejong: 1 Samuel 2:30 “those who honor God, God will honor”
That’s my life verse!


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Brendon Davis: Keeping Composure

The K Zone

January 10th  2017

Brendon Davis

Interviewed By Mike Duffy


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Brendon Davis is not just a great player but a great person too.  In 2017 he was traded to the Texas Rangers for Yu Darvish.


Mike Duffy: I was wondering when you go from high school, minor leagues, to the majors, what was the biggest challenge when you reach each stage?

Brendon Davis: So, I think the biggest jump from HS to pro baseball is realizing the importance of routine so you can be ready to play everyday. The professional season is a lot longer.


Mike Duffy: What did you do best this season?

Brendon Davis: I think the best thing I did this season was keeping my composure through the good and bad times.


Mike Duffy: This offseason whats the major thing your planning to work on?

Brendon Davis: This off season the main thing I am working on is strength and speed.


Mike Duffy: Whats was your favorite thing about being an Dodger?

Brendon Davis: Favorite thing about being a dodger is the food (organic).


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Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite hobby besides baseball?

Brendon Davis: Favorite hobby has to be disc golf lol.


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Mike Duffy: Who was your favorite baseball player growing up?

Brendon Davis: Favorite player growing up, Vladimir Guerrero.


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Mike Duffy: What went through your mind when you were drafted?

Brendon Davis: When I was drafted the main thing going through my mind was I get a chance to live my dream.


Mike Duffy: Who’s the hardest pitcher you faced this season?

Brendon Davis: Hardest pitcher I faced this season, tough one. None of them amazed me.


Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite stadium?

Brendon Davis: Fort Wayne tin caps stadium.


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Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite movie/tv show?

Brendon Davis: How to get away with murder.


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Mike Duffy: What was it like being ranked in the dodgers top 30 prospects? Do you think of it a lot?

Brendon Davis: It’s an honor but I don’t really think of it a lot. It’s simply just a number and I have to produce or that means nothing.


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Jahmai Jones: Keep a smile on your face, and a song in your Heart!

The K Zone

January 9th  2017

Jahmai Jones

Interviewed By Mike Duffy


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Mike Duffy: I was wondering when you go from high school, minor leagues, to the majors, what was the biggest challenge when you reach each stage?

Jahmai Jones: The biggest challenge was the speed of the game, everyone who has been The biggest challenge was the speed of the game, everyone who has been drafted was the best at their school and area. They were “the guy” where they were playing and everyone is a good player. So just adjusting to competition and facing adversity with open arms rather than shying away from it.


Mike Duffy: What did you do best this season?

Jahmai Jones: The best thing i did this season was just try and be an overall player. Defensively, stealing bases, getting on, and being a role model on and off of the field.


Mike Duffy: This offseason whats the major thing your planning to work on?

Jahmai Jones: This off season was one that was planned More on making slight adjustments to my swing and working out the little kinks that needed to be fixed after the season.


Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite thing about being an Angel?

Jahmai Jones: My favorite thing about being an Angel is the atmosphere and passion the organization brings every single day. We are going to do big things and we bring the mentality of not giving up regardless the situation.


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Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite hobby besides baseball?

Jahmai Jones: Favorite hobby outside of baseball is being outside like golf, fishing hunting, and hiking. I enjoy being active so much when i am not playing baseball.


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Mike Duffy: Who was your favorite baseball player growing up?

Jahmai Jones: Favorite player Growing up was Andrew McCutchen just his style of play and the way he handles himself on and off the field is something i strive to be like on an every day basis.


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Mike Duffy: What went through your mind when you were drafted?

Jahmai Jones: My thoughts on draft day were just waiting patiently to see what team was going to draft me and waiting for the moment for my dream to finally become a reality.


Mike Duffy: Who’s the hardest pitcher you faced this season?

Jahmai Jones: Hardest pitcher i faced this season is actually a buddy of mine and his name is Dylan Cease. He’s In the cubs organization and he’s dedicated to the game and it definitely shows when he steps on the mound.


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Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite stadium?

Jahmai Jones: Favorite stadium i played in this year was either the Billings Mustangs (reds affiliate) or Peoria Cardinals (Cardinals affiliate) amazing atmospheres and absolutely great fields.


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Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite movie/tv show?

Jahmai Jones: Favorite show might be game of thrones or how i met your mother haha!


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Mike Duffy: Do you have a motto or a thing to do to get you out of a rough time?

Jahmai Jones: My dad used to always tell me “keep a smile on your face, and a song in your heart.” That phrase is something i keep with me always.


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Mike Duffy: What is it like to have a brother in professional football?

Jahmai Jones: It’s awesome. Being able to watch someone do what they love and being able to watch him on tv is awesome. He’s one of my role models in my family and i have nothing but the upmost respect for him. It also helped on draft day because i had a better idea of what was gonna happen because i was able to be with him on his draft day. So i had an idea of what i needed to do and how i would feel during that moment. But at the end of the day, he’s my brother and i love him.


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Tyler Erwin: Reliving for the Orioles

The K Zone

January 8th  2017

Tyler Erwin

Interviewed By Mike Duffy



In 2016 Tyler Erwin was drafted in the 23rd round out of New Mexico State and played for the Orioles Class A Short Season Affiliate Aberdeen Ironbirds. He posted a 3.22 era in 22 innings playing for the Ironbirds and appeared in 13 games.


Mike Duffy: I was wondering when you go from high school, minor leagues, to the majors, what was the biggest challenge when you reach each stage?
Tyler Erwin: First off, getting to each stage is very difficult. Once at each stage the biggest challenge I faced personally was understanding new ways on how to cope with failure. At each point you are going to have games where nothing goes your way out on the mound and it’s in those moments a person really finds out how important this game is to them.


Mike Duffy:  What did you do best this season?

Tyler Erwin: In my first professional season, I really started to study the game more. In college it’s easy to just beat a guy purely based off talent, but in pro ball you are facing some of the best players in the world. But this year I watched hitters more than I ever have, and began learning how to approach each guy and how to attack him effectively.


Mike Duffy: This offseason whats the major thing your planning to work on?

Tyler Erwin: This offseason is different than any other that I have had in previous years. You are very much on your own and have to be the person constantly pushing yourself. My major thing I’m working on this offseason is getting bigger, stronger, and more explosive. From a pitching standpoint, my focus is on my continued progress on command of all my pitches.


Mike Duffy: Whats your favorite thing about being an Oriole?

Tyler Erwin: Being drafted by the Orioles has been a blessing. I’m very proud to be in such a storied and tremendous organization. My favorite part about being an Oriole is the attention to detail in all facets that the organization teaches us.


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Mike Duffy:  What is your favorite hobby besides baseball?

Tyler Erwin: My favorite hobby outside of baseball is lifting. I love being in the gym, and learning new styles of lifting.


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Mike Duffy:  Who was your favorite baseball player growing up?

Tyler Erwin: Being a left handed pitcher, growing up I loved watching Randy Johnson pitch. When he retired, my favorite pitcher to watch compete was Sean Doolittle.


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Mike Duffy: What made you a dominant reliever this year?

Tyler Erwin: As a reliever, I really try and dominate the bottom half of the zone. I understand if I focus on this I will induce more ground ball outs which keep my defensive awake and ready to make plays behind me. Limiting the walks and throwing more strikes is crucial when relieving.


Mike Duffy:  What went through your mind when you were drafted?

Tyler Erwin: The day I was drafted was a lot of emotions mixed all together. It was an extremely special day for my family and friends that have helped me get to that point. When I saw my name on the ticker, with a O’s logo next to my name I felt an extreme sense of pride. It is truly a day that I will never forget.


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Mike Duffy:  Hardest batter you faced this season?

Tyler Erwin: I faced a lot of great hitters this year, but one of the most difficult guys I had to face was Pete Alonso. He is a very dangerous hitter who really forces you to make mistakes and dominates those mistakes.


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Mike Duffy:  What is your favorite stadium?

Tyler Erwin: My favorite major league stadium would have to be Camden Yards or Wrigley Field. They are both awesome parks, with a ton of history in their walls. My favorite stadium that I played in this year by far was in Aberdeen, the fans and the love they have for the Ironbirds is incredible.


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Mike Duffy: What is your favorite movie/tv show?

Tyler Erwin: I don’t get to watch a ton of tv but I just recently started watching The Office and that by far is my favorite tv show! My favorite movie would have to be either Saving Private Ryan, or Wedding Crashers.


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Mike Duffy:  Do you have a motto or a thing to do to get you out of a rough time?

Tyler Erwin: I try to be a positive person no matter what is thrown at me, with that said a motto that helps me is something my junior college coach Tyler Gillum use to always yell at us, NDCQ (not dead can’t quit). That motto really always resonated with me and pushed me.


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Shane Sawczak: Stayin Saucey

The K Zone

January 7th  2017

Updated on December 9th 2017

Shane Sawczak

Interviewed By Mike Duffy



Mike Duffy: How did you get a better control on the ball to get your era down?

Shane Sawczak: I learned how to locate my fastball. Throwing it on both sides of the plate and getting ahead of the hitters. First pitch strikes are key.


Mike Duffy: Hardest thing about pitching?

Shane Sawczak:  The hardest thing about pitching is knowing you will get hit and give up runs but you gotta move past it and keep pitching.


Mike Duffy: Best thing about pitching?

Shane Sawczak: The best thing about pitching is knowing that you are on the mound pitching for your team, then trusting you and you having their backs. Also striking someone out or in my case picking them off at first base (that’s my specialty).


Mike Duffy:  What are your favorite things to do during the off-season?

Shane Sawczak: My favorite thing about off-season and relaxing with friends and family. Learning about myself and looking forward to next season. Working out everyday to get bigger and stronger!


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Mike Duffy: Role model?

Shane Sawczak: My role model is my mom. She’s strong and helps me out with everything. Teaches me about training and eating the correct food.


Mike Duffy: Favorite thing about being a Marlin?

Shane Sawczak: The best thing about being a marlin has to be the location. I also live in south Florida and that’s where they are based. I grew up going to the games and cheering them on.


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Mike Duffy: Do you have a motto?

Shane Sawczak: I have several mottos

  1. Your very best (YVB)
  2. Take care of the little things, and the big things will take care of themselves
  3. Always stay saucey (lmao)

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Mike Duffy: I was wondering  when you go from high school to the minor leagues, what was the biggest challenge when you reach each stage?

Shane Sawczak: With each stage, every player gets smarter and smarter. The hitters don’t help you out at all. You have to be mentally focused and prepare yourself for every single game.


Mike Duffy: Goals for this offseason?

Shane Sawczak: My goals for this offseason are just staying healthy, improving in the weight room and improving my weaknesses. I need to learn how to locate my off-speed better. Improve better spin on my curveball and throw it for a strike and for a strike out pitch. Then simple improve mechanics and the small things.


Mike Duffy: What is your favorite Tv show?

Shane Sawczak: For my favorite Tv show, I’ve always been of fan of watching “friends”. My mom always watched it when I️ was a baby and I️ just never got over it. I️m also a fan “diesel brothers”


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Mike Duffy: When did you know you wanted to play professional baseball?

Shane Sawczak: Around high school I️ realized I️ had a chance to play professional. I️ was just always the smallest pitcher on the team. And then my freshmen year of college I️ filled out and I️ really knew I️ was capable of playing pro ball.


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Mike Duffy: What is your favorite baseball memory?

Shane Sawczak: My favorite baseball memory was when I️ was 8 and we were in the AAU national championship. We won a big gold ring that was customized to our liking. I️ still remember the game we won and I️ caught the winning out of the game.


Mike Duffy: Who is your favorite Musician and song?

Shane Sawczak: I️ve always been a fan of country music. I️ like Kenny Cheney, Thomas Rhett, Alan Jackson. Any kind of island music I️m into.


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Mike Duffy: What is your favorite hobby besides baseball?

Shane Sawczak: Other hobbies I️ enjoy are boating and fixing up old wooden boats.  My current job right now is “classic wooden boats”


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The Relieving Future of Baseball: A Graph-ic Novel

-The K Zone-

December 25th, 2016

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Andrew Miller, of the 2016 Postseason Indians, showed just how valuable a multi-inning reliever could be

The Relieving Future of Baseball: A Graph-ic Novel, by Ian Joffe

When reminiscing on the Dodger’s 2016 playoff run, one of the most memorable moments that comes to mind was in game National League Divisional Series against the Washington Nationals. If you need a refresher, star closer Kenley Jansen had already pitched the 7th and 8th innings, and after allowing two walks in the ninth, it seemed he was tiring out. Jansen still needed two outs, but his control was clearly fading, it was a one run game, and Dodgers’ postseason nemesis Daniel Murphy was at the plate. How did manager Dave Roberts solve this dilemma? He shocked the world, sending starting pitching ace Clayton Kershaw, perhaps the best pitcher of this generation, to the hill. Kershaw made quick work of Murphy and Wilmir Difo, to collect the save and help the team move on to play the Cubs in the NLCS.

The successful use of Kershaw the closer is an omen of a change to come in the future of baseball. As time goes by, the role of the starter in baseball will dwindle down to nothing, and relievers will dominate all nine innings of the game. The idea may sound slightly insane, but there is certainly precedent for it. MLB is always trending towards more and more reliever usage (the y-axis is the average IP of a starter, per start in the given year):

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Source: http://www.vivaelbirdos.com/2014/1/13/5296618/why-the-stat-of-pitching-wins-is-obsolete-in-one-graph

This graph shows the how the use of starting pitchers has been diminished throughout the years. The trend clearly shows that starters are being hooked earlier in games, allowing relievers to take the field. The importance of relievers is further shown here:

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Source: https://theringer.com/relief-pitcher-atari-closer-bullpen-f1a4b04e4084#.2mb2tfwu8

Each year, more and more relievers are utilized by teams. The trends are clear. It is very reasonable to continue these curves, and estimate that in the next few decades, the role of a starter could be only a few innings – basically making them relievers themselves.  Teams continue to rely on relief pitchers more, and there is reason why they do so.

Relievers are simply more effective at getting the outs they have to get than starters. Batting average against, the measure of how well or poorly one gets outs, shows this trend:P12.png

Source: http://www.livewild.org/bb/pitchingstaff/

My apologies that the graph only goes up to 2005, but you get the idea. Since the true introduction of the reliever in the mid-late 20th century, that role has retired batters at a consistently more efficient rate. There are two main reason for this. First of all, it is generally true that as the game goes on, pitchers tire out more. P14.png

Source: http://www.livewild.org/bb/pitchingstaff/

The y-axis is a statistic that is very similar to BAA (batting average against), but makes all pitchers and hitters equal, normalizing them to average based on their other performances over the course of the season. Aside from the first six outs or so, pitchers get less and less effective as the game goes on, and are less able to perform the most necessary task of baseball: creating outs. However, over the first five batters or so, which is about how long a reliever is expected to pitch for, there is little to no regression. Overall, pitchers tire out over the course of the game, but are okay for the first five batters or so. The other reason why starters have higher ERAs than relievers is that pitchers get worse each time they see a certain hitter.

Times Through Lineup Opp. wOBA, adjusted to player quality
1 .340
2 .350
3 .359

Source: http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=22156

The chart shows the relationship between the number of times a pitcher has gone through the batting order and their opposing wOBA (a statistic similar to, but more accurate than SLG%), after it is adjusted to the fact that pitchers tire out, plus batter quality increases later in the game. It is a clear pattern that each time a pitcher faces a batter, they get worse. Starters will face each batter twice, three times, or more, while relievers may only face each batter once. This is just another reason why short-term pitchers are more effective than long-term pitchers.

Thus, the trends are justified. They show that the future of the game is dominated by relievers, and there is reason why this would happen: the nature of the relief pitcher is better than the nature of the starter. There is just one obstacle blocking this trend: value. Today’s sabermetric front offices are looking for players that can give the most productivity for what they are paid. It would be difficult for a reliever, who may pitch two or three innings every five days, to match a starter who might pitch six innings, over the same period of time. This is why, to fit the trends, the role of the reliever must change.

This postseason, pitchers like Andrew Miller, Aroldis Chapman, and Kenley Jansen filled larger roles than just their usual one inning. They put together outings of 5, 6, and 7 outs. Through outings like those, relievers will achieve values close to or above those of starters. When I look into the crystal orb for MLB, I see teams holding two sets of 4-5 pitchers, who will each throw about two innings, or about 6-9 batters, every other day. The rest of the pitching staff (2-4 pitchers, if a team carries 12 on their roster) can be used as depth in case a usual pitcher is having a rough outing, someone gets hurt, or the game goes into extra innings.

In this reality, pitchers throw about 160 inning each year. This is nearly as much as a starter, and will therefore come at much better value, as starters are paid far more than relievers:01-444.jpg

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-mlbs-highest-paid-positions-2014-7

Top relievers and closers make about the least amount of money compared to other positions, especially starters, who make the most. This data set was put together in 2014, before deals like Chapman’s $86MM, Jansen’s $80MM, and Melancon’s $62MM, so relievers and starters will likely be paid a bit more now, but so will all the other positions. In general, relievers are paid very little compared to starters, and if relievers are pitching nearly as many innings, that means they will be a relative bargain. Additionally, at least from my fantasy mindset, the reliever closer markets have relative depth. Last year, I was able to pick up most of my staff after pick #100, and I plan to do the same this season. That means teams should not have to pay top dollar to get a valuable relief pitcher.

As a final value point, relievers are far less likely to have to go under the knife than starters. In an interview with Grantland (Source: http://grantland.com/the-triangle/tommy-john-epidemic-elbow-surgery-glenn-fleisig-yu-darvish/), baseball doctor Glenn Fleising said:

“Pitchers, especially those who on the younger side, are far more likely to get hurt if they throw more than 80 pitches per appearance.”

Relievers, especially in my two-inning system, would rarely throw 80 pitches. It is extremely important for players to be able to be able to stay on the field, especially in this day and age of seemingly constant injuries. It is highly valuable for players to be producing as often as they can, meaning not constantly breaking their bodies. Lack of injuries is all the more reason to increase the value of relief pitchers. It is arguable that if we start to force relievers to throw triple innings per season, it will make them more likely to be hurt. But, what if we took starters, and decreased their workload from 200 to 160 innings. In the future of baseball, players will be trained throughout their whole professional career to throw their 160 innings, to account for the benefits of relief pitching and value/productivity. Those who are trained to be starters are able to go 200 innings per year, so if on is trained to pitch 160 innings per year, they will able to do so. The future of MLB is certainly a relieving one.

Check out my debate with Mike over the Dodgers next second baseman, my piece about the Royal’s big mistake, or an interview with Zach Eflin.

 

Many thanks to my data sources! I recommend that you guys click those links and read the articles, many are extremely good.

Image Attribuitions:

http://www.computerworld.com/article/3022514/data-analytics/yahoo-has-released-a-ton-of-anonymized-user-data-to-help-machine-learning-scientists.html

Heels in MLB: Cleveland Indians’ pitcher Andrew Miller, MVP 2016 ALCS

Jacob Nix: Let The F*cker Fly

The K Zone

December 10th  2016 / Updated August 13th 2018

Jacob Nix

Interview by Mike Duffy


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On August 10th 2018, Nix made his Major League debut.

“That call came a little sooner than expected, but Nix showed he was more than ready for it on Friday night, as the Padres rode his strong MLB debut to a 2-0 victory over the Phillies at Petco Park.” –  Jack Baer of MLB.com


Mike Duffy: Who was your role model growing up?

Jacob Nix:  My grandpa is definitely my role model.


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Mike Duffy: What is the hardest thing about pitching?

Jacob Nix: The hardest thing about pitching is that sometimes things really don’t go your way out there haha. You can do everything right, make the right pitches in the right location and sometimes things just flat out don’t go your way.


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Mike Duffy:  Who has been the hardest batter faced so far?

Jacob Nix:  Eloy Jimenez for sure. The guy flat out crushes balls!


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Mike Duffy:  What is your favorite ball park you have played in?

Jacob Nix:  My favorite thing about the season was playing at Parkview Field all year. That park is incredible and I’ll definitely miss it!


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Mike Duffy:  Do you have a motto?

Jacob Nix:  My motto that I put on all my gloves is “LTFF” and it means “let the f*cker fly”.


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Mike Duffy: What did you do to get on the right track last season (2016 season) ?

Jacob Nix: Mechanically I really didn’t change anything, I mainly focused more on repeating my mechanics and being consistent.


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Mike Duffy:  What will you be working on this off season (2016-17 off season) ?

Jacob Nix: This off season/spring training my biggest goal is to develop my change up and get come comfortable with it so that it can be a weapon for me in the future.


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Jacob Nix with Mike Duffy on his debut weekend!

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Imani Abdullah: Can I take this call?

-The K Zone-

December 9th  2016

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In 2015 Imani Abdullah received a call from Magic Johnson while in his 3rd period class at Madison High school to be told he was selected by the Dodgers in the 11th round. Two years later he has just come off a very strong season with the Great Lake Loons (Dodgers A affiliate) pitching 72.1 innings while having a 3.61 era and a 1.13 WHIP (walks+hits/Innings Pitched). I hope you enjoy my interview with Dodger prospect Imani Abdullah!

 

Mike Duffy: What was it like finding out you were drafted during school??

Imani Abdullah: It’s was crazy! A Dream come true. I found out during my third period stats class!

Mike Duffy: What is your favorite thing about being a dodger?

Imani Abdullah: The dodgers are big on building strong relationships and I love that.. I also like the fact that they treat/evaluate all players equally regardless of who you are or what round you got drafted…

Mike Duffy: What was the moment this season?

Imani Abdullah: The best thing I did during the season was celebrate after we won the Midwest league championship!

Mike Duffy: What was it like winning the championship? 

Imani Abdullah: Absolute amazing… coming together as a team and winning the Midwest league title was one of the best feelings in the world.

Mike Duffy: Who is the toughest hitter you have faced?

Imani Abdullah: Eloy Jimenez…….

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Mike Duffy: Best thing about pitching?

Imani Abdullah: For me, the Best part about pitching is that you’re in control and you’re the leader. When you’re on the mound you play a big part of that teams win or even loss.. (hopefully a win lol).

Mike Duffy: Hardest thing about pitching? 

Imani Abdullah: Trying to find a way to get outs without having your best stuff

Mike Duffy: Do you have a motto? 

Imani Abdullah: I don’t really have a motto..

Mike Duffy: Who are your role models?

Imani Abdullah: I’ve always looked up to my parents as role models. They have always guided me in the right direction and they always support me in the decisions I make.

 

 

 

pic credit: The Great Lakes Loons’ Imani Abdullah pitches during the Loons’ game against the Lansing Lugnuts at Dow Diamond on Wednesday, June 29, 2016. (Josie Norris | MLive.com File) (Josie Norris | MLive.com File) 

 

 

Ryan Miller: Keep working when your alone

-The K Zone-

December 8th  2016

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Just coming off his 3rd season in the Minor leagues he had a pretty good seaosn in AA. He’s a big believer in working hard and being the best person you can be when none is watching. I hope you enjoy my interview with Padres catcher Ryan Miller!

Mike Duffy: Favorite memory this season?

Ryan Miller: Hitting a walk off single… cause the night before I had the opportunity to have a walk off but got out Role model – I always looked up to Yadier Molina ! Great defensive catcher , leader, and becoming a better offensive player year by year.

Mike Duffy: Do you have a motto?

Ryan Miller: Who are you when no one is watching

Mike Duffy: Favorite thing about being a Padre?

Ryan Miller: Near my hometown! The best city in the world. Lovely sites, beaches. Beautiful ball park

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Mike Duffy: Best thing about catching?

Ryan Miller: you’re in charge, you see the whole field , control the game. You’re in every pitch. A lot going on physically and mentally

Mike Duffy: Hardest thing about catching?

Ryan Miller: I would say the mental and physical tear it puts on your body !

Mike Duffy: Favorite person to catch?

Ryan Miller: I don’t necessarily have one favorite pitcher, I have a few. But it’s usually those who trust in me. Trust the plan. Have good tempo and hit spots majority of the time. Makes the game smooth and kinda fly by. Connections with pitchers is huge

Mike Duffy: Favorite pitcher to face?

Ryan Miller: And same with a pitcher to face but I believe stats show I do better against left handers , so I’ll stick with that haha. Lefties

Mike Duffy: Favorite stadium to play in?

Ryan Miller: Probably when in Low A , the Fort Wayne Tincaps . It’s basically a mini big league field. It’s beautiful, well maintained. Always stuff going on and always have a packed crowd